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DuMond Prismatic Landscape Palette

 


Back in March of 2018 I decided to recreate the DuMond Prismatic Landscape Palette Chart and donate it to the Ridgewood Art Institute.  That’s me above in the video creating the new chart. The original chart that we used was made by Joe Paquet.  As you can see it was heavily used and covered in paint swatches.  This made it difficult to discern the original values and colors that lay underneath.



The new chart is much easier to read and will provide many years of use. It was nice to get a nod by former Board Member Ed Horvath of the Ridgewood Art Institute for my contribution to furthering the Frank Vincent DuMond, Arthur F. Maynard, and John P. Osborne legacy at the Ridgewood Art Institue. 








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